Visiting the High Museum of Art in Atlanta

Yesterday Eliza, Rayna, and I took a day trip to Atlanta to visit the high Museum of Art.  We were particularly excited to see their temporary exhibit “Picasso to Warhol: Fourteen Modern Masters.”  While the High is not the largest museum, nor does it have the most extensive collection I have ever seen, it has a nice atmosphere and some really fascinating pieces of work.  We were additionally excited that both Eliza and I got in for free yesterday, and as such we only had to pay for Rayna’s ticket (making the whole day trip cheaper than we had previously anticipated).

I have mentioned in previous posts how much I enjoy getting to see art up close and in person.  This is the way in which art is intended to be viewed.  I find, that especially with modern and contemporary art, it is absolutely essential to see the works in person. Eliza commented that she had never understood the appeal of Jackson Pollack until she got to stand just a few feet from a few of his giant pieces yesterday.  Likewise, I had never really understood or appreciated anything by Piet Mondrian, until I had the opportunity yesterday to see how his work progressed from very detailed to the more and more minimalist famous grip paintings, and read about his philosophies of artistic deconstruction.  Modern art can be very strange, and while I still question the merits of some of it, I think it is foolish to be entirely dismissive of the movements and the works.

If you get a chance to visit the High before April 29th (when the Picasso to Warhol exhibit ends) I highly recommend doing so.  Just getting an opportunity to see Henri Matisse‘s “The Dance (I)” in person is entirely worth it.

~ by Nathaniel on February 6, 2012.

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